Companies striving to bring bike share program to Fayetteville, UA

 Emily Voight stops for a cup of coffee and a pastry Friday at the Bike NWA Energizer Station set up on the Razorback Greenway at Arsaga’s at The Depot in Fayetteville. Bike NWA was celebrating Bike to Work Day with stations along the Razorback Greenway. May is National Bike Month, sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists, and Friday was National Bike to Work Day. The events are intended to promote the benefits of bicycling and encourage more people to give bicycling a try. Fayetteville and University of Arkansas are partnering to develop a bike share program for the city.

Emily Voight stops for a cup of coffee and a pastry Friday at the Bike NWA Energizer Station set up on the Razorback Greenway at Arsaga’s at The Depot in Fayetteville. Bike NWA was celebrating Bike to Work Day with stations along the Razorback Greenway. May is National Bike Month, sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists, and Friday was National Bike to Work Day. The events are intended to promote the benefits of bicycling and encourage more people to give bicycling a try. Fayetteville and University of Arkansas are partnering to develop a bike share program for the city.

via Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

FAYETTEVILLE—More people could get around campus and all over town on two wheels once a selection committee awards a contract to one of the burgeoning bike share companies in the world.

Bids for a bike share program closed Thursday. The University of Arkansas, Fayetteville and the city collaborated on the specifications for the contract. Companies will pitch their ideas to a committee of university and city officials, and an agreement could be in place by June.

The bids mark the latest turn in the road to bringing a bicycle sharing program to the city. The effort began in earnest about three years ago, said Dane Eifling, joint bicycle coordinator for the city and university. A program could roll out before the fall school semester begins, he said.

Innovations in technology, especially since last fall, have dramatically changed the bike share landscape, advocates say. Dockless programs, such as ones in Dallas, San Diego and Melbourne, Australia, give users freedom to drop bikes off at just about any bike rack, rather than the specially made stations associated with a docked program.

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